Burda Style Boxy Top: 112 08/17

Well, my sewing friends, I had hoped to post about this top last week, but a few ongoing family health concerns and my own bad back conspired against me. Anyway, I’m here now to share my latest make: a boxy and fairly cropped sweater. I know I’m not alone in absolutely loving the August issue of Burda Style magazine. I’ve heard bloggers and Instagram sewists raving about it and I’m no different. There are so many wonderful designs and I couldn’t wait to get stuck into sewing one, so I decided to start fairly simple with this sweater. Now, don’t die of shock…but I’ve never, ever traced a pattern in my life (I know, who knew?) and talk about ‘diving in at the deep end’! Those multiple tracing lines on Burda patterns…woah! But hey, I survived and dare I say, I rather enjoyed the process, so there you go.

Anyway, I had traced the size the size 38, to begin with, but after measuring the width of the pieces, I decided that it was quite generous and I didn’t want to be swamped in the fit, so I sized down one size. As it turned out this was perfect and all I did was to add almost an inch to the overall length of the body. The sleeves were fine as they were. I also made the neckline a smidge lower.

My fabric is a viscose blend ponte knit that I bought from Clothspot last year and I’d describe the colour as a peachy salmon. Of course, never one to just make a pattern up without putting a unique design touch to it, I decided to try adding a bit of visual interest to break up the plainness in the form of randomly placed pintucks. It was really easy to do….I just took my plastic ruler and using a Frixion pen I ruled random vertical lines over all the fabric pieces until I got a pleasing effect. Note: Just in case sewing the tucks took up a little of the width, I cut each piece a bit wider first, stitched the tucks and then re-cut each piece.

For stitching the ponte knit I used a Schmetz jersey needle in size 70 and each tuck was created by stitching about 1.5- 2mm from the folded edge of the fabric. Then all of the loose ends were sewn in invisibly by hand. The main body, sleeves, and hems were really easy to assemble. It’s actually a quick make if you don’t embellish like I did.

I would say the only tricky bit is the neckline. Burda gives you the measurements for a length of fabric which you have to seam together and then fill with a piece of batting/wadding. I had some thick, but lightweight polyester padding and I used a narrow strip of it, joined it together and basted (see next photo on the left). Note: I found the length of fabric they suggested to be a bit long, so shortened mind by about 3cm, but fabrics vary. You have to carefully stitch the wadded roll neck to the neckline without over stretching. In the end, I stitched mine on by hand. After it’s stitched on, I recommend that you grade and clip the layers of fabric under the band to help it to lie flatter and more neatly.

All, in all, I really like this sweater and I’ll be honest in saying that I had my doubts about the boxy shape at first, but I think it’s good to step out of one’s comfort zone. I love the easy vibe of the style and I rather like how it looks with my culottes (these are self-drafted made with a poly twill from Clothspot). I’ll also wear it with cream jeans, olive trousers, and dark wash cropped jeans. Would I make another? Yes! But first I want to make some more culottes…the cowl neck raglan from August Burda…a tweed A line skirt…my Plaid jacket….some more trousers…and the list goes on!

Till next time…See you soon!

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14 Comments

  1. September 8, 2017 / 3:45 pm

    Looks fab diane: the colour, shape and style. Very nice, especially with the culottes.

    • Diane G
      September 8, 2017 / 3:59 pm

      Thanks Manju, glad you like it. The culottes have been neglected lately so I intend wearing them more now I have this top, because I love the combo.

  2. September 8, 2017 / 4:52 pm

    This looks lovely on you Diane! I’ve never used wadding for a neck feature before, for a simple-ish top it has some interesting quirks (especially the pintucks you added!) that just take it to the next level while still being wearable. Massive thumbs up from me!!

    • Diane G
      September 8, 2017 / 5:42 pm

      Aww, thanks Helen, glad you like it. And yes, I am partial to a few quirks 😊

  3. September 9, 2017 / 2:01 pm

    Wow, Diane – this top is fabulous! I love the color, the cut, and the pin tucks you added really take it to the next level. Your process for doing that is great too…I just might have to try that some time. Love your culottes too, and they really work well with the cropped top.

    • Diane G
      September 9, 2017 / 2:15 pm

      Thanks for that lovely comment Linda, I appreciate it 🙂 And you should definitely try adding some tucks to something, as it’s pretty easy to do.

  4. September 13, 2017 / 8:44 am

    Diane this is awesome , you turned a basic top to a cool and unique one, love love it..

    • Diane G
      September 13, 2017 / 8:55 am

      Thank you Ece! It’s so lovely of you to stop by my humble blog. I really appreciate your comment 🙂

  5. September 13, 2017 / 8:13 pm

    I left a comment when I was on the bus, but sadly it didn’t work! ☹️ I was going to say how clever of you to sew those kind of reverse pintucks into your top! I’ll have to remember that one someday for my own top! Just lovely!

    • Diane G
      September 13, 2017 / 8:18 pm

      Ah, shame Linda. No nothing came through to me before. Anyway, thank you for your sweet comment x

  6. September 14, 2017 / 3:36 am

    this is absolutely gorgeous! I love the shape, and the colour and your embellishment is a clever idea to add al title bit of interest. LOVE!

    • Diane G
      September 14, 2017 / 7:01 am

      That’s so lovely of you, thanks for the sweater love Carolyn 😘

  7. Karie
    September 22, 2017 / 12:42 am

    I love a nice boxy top and yours is super cute! What a great way to embellish it.

    • Diane G
      September 22, 2017 / 5:32 pm

      Thanks Karie. It’s a nice little versatile pattern.

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